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Harry Kane fivers estimated at over £50,000 each on the loose

Harry Kane, Colchester Utd v Tottenham Hotspur FA Cup - hydrogen1 on Flickr.com
Harry Kane by John Parish on Flicrk.com

Birmingham micro-engraver Graham Short has released a new set of notes, engraved with the portrait of footballer Harry Kane.

Short last engraved Jane Austen’s portrait on a series of £5 notes that were then estimated to be worth over £20,000 each, and first shot to global fame when his engraving of a portrait of HM The Queen on the eye of a needle fetched over £100,000 at auction. He has produced numerous pieces of engraved artwork for royalty, celebrities and art collectors here and around the world, as well as the Jane Austen £5 notes marking the 200th anniversary of her death.

After Harry Kane picked up the Golden Boot at this summer’s FIFA World Cup, leading England to the semi-finals, Short decided to repeat the feat with Kane’s portrait.

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To create the engravings, Short only works between midnight and 5am, when traffic vibrations are at their most limited and he can bring his heart-rate down to 30 beats per minute, as he engraves between beats. He also has botox injections and binds his right arm to a chair to reduce body movement.

He said:

“I’ve done six – one for each goal he scored – for Harry himself, the FA and four to be spent as we did with the Jane Austen notes around the UK and Ireland.”

Originally estimated to have a value of around £20,000 each, by Thursday 3 July, the media was estimating their worth to be around £50,000. Three of the notes have been spent: in Meriden, in the centre of England, in Edinburgh’s Elephant House: the coffee shop where JK Rowling started writing about Harry Potter, and in Merthyr Tydfil, with the fourth to be spent in Northern Ireland.

Graham Short at Elephant House
Graham Short at Elephant House


At around £50,000 each, they could be a nice earner for a charity. The hunt is on….
 
 

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