Fundraising news, ideas and inspiration for professional charity fundraisers

Everyone of your donors will die – and that’s the good news!

RNLI
Everyone of your donors will die – and that’s the good news!

And if you want the bad news look no further: 93% of people don’t leave a legacy to charity. Those that do manage to leave over £2.24 billion, so just imagine the amount if even 10% did this say, 120 new Children in Needs!

Your mission, if you choose to accept it, is to change those statistics and why wouldn’t you want to massively increase your organisation’s income. Could it be that we suspect that we will only be befitting the next fundraiser’s income or the one after that?

Some of us do a little – reminding people gently, sending out a will-making guide and praying – and some do a lot like the excellent legacy ad from RNLI ‘Your Legacy Could Be A Lifesaver’. Or Greenpeace’s legendary “If you come back as a whale, you’d wish you had left a legacy to Greenpeace.”

Legacy campaigns I have been involved with tend to favour free will making weeks or, like RNLI, months; but is the fact it costs money to have a solicitor make out your will really what puts people off? And is that the best angle to run a campaign. Perhaps it would be more effective to run ‘make out your will’ days with a solicitor on hand to give advice and help out. One thing you can be sure of is that it is far more effective to be left a percentage of the residue of a will, when loved ones have been taken care of, than it is to receive a lump sum which can be paltry by comparison.

Maybe it is merely facing up to our own mortality that puts us off; but if that is really so perhaps we should campaign for the making out a will to be compulsory or any money left goes to the Big Lottery. Well, say 10% at least, and may I suggest that we also start a campaign for anyone leaving over £1m in their will to have 5% automatically go to charity. Either a charity they specify or into a fund. Indeed, the Big Lottery Fund could supervise that money too.

Surprisingly, 35% say that they would leave a charitable gift in their will, after taking care of family etc. but only 7% do that. So, maybe the opposition would not be too great.

All these statistics are from nfpSynergy the excellent research for non-profits https://nfpsynergy.net/

Yes, I have made out my will and no, I’m not going to tell you to whom I have my money.

John Baguley
Chair Group IFC
Groupifc.com

2,507 total views, 3 views today

John Baguley is the CEO of the International Fundraising Consultancy (IFC) and a Fellow of the Institute of Fundraising. IFC has a global reach with nine country directors and runs the free First Fridays fundraising consultancy service. John is a regular speaker at international fundraising conventions, and a writer and blogger on fundraising.
  • Me too! I wrote my Will the first time when I was 24, well before I was able to afford to own somewhere to live. My LP and CD collection was probably my most valuable asset – to me, at any rate.

    But I still wrote a Will as I wanted some control over where the precious (to me) things would go. And yes, from the beginning I included a charity. That has now grown to three.

    I strongly encourage all fundraisers to write a Will, and to encourage their colleagues to do so too.

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