Asthma UK highlight true danger of the condition

Howard Lake | 8 February 2008 | News

Asthma UK is launching a media campaign called ‘Don’t Wait’ to highlight the true danger of asthma and raise vital funds to support research into the causes and treatment of the condition which affects 1 in 5 households in the UK.
The nation-wide integrated campaign, which launches on Monday 11 February, uses the Don’t Wait message to urge people Don’t Wait to fund research today that could save lives tomorrow and features in national press adverts and inserts, web adverts, direct mail, PR activity and a microsite www.dont-wait.org

The campaign, which follows a successful DRTV campaign, aims to make more people aware of how serious asthma can be. In fact more people die each year of asthma than cervical cancer and testicular cancer combined and a shocking 2.6 million people in the UK live on a knife edge because of difficult to control asthma. Sadly, they face frequent hospital visits or can be stuck in their own homes, trapped by breathlessness.

Jenny, a 31 year old with asthma, comments: ‘I developed severe asthma when I was 18. Until then I guess I had the usual view – that somebody with asthma just felt a bit wheezy now and then and needed to use an inhaler. Now I’ve seen it from the other side as I fight for breath each day, frequently being admitted to hospital. Asthma is deadly serious’.Asthma UK - don't wait campaign image

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Neil Churchill, Asthma UK Chief Executive comments: ‘Asthma UK is one of the UK’s major funders of asthma research, spending more than the Government in this area, yet each year we are unable to support all of the high-quality research proposals we receive due to lack of funds. Tragically every 7 hours a person dies following an asthma attack, but with regular donations Asthma UK can continue to fund vital research projects and bring about the breakthroughs that could save lives.’

Comedian Bill Bailey has also pledged his support for the campaign and comments, ‘Whether it’s been debilitating, sometimes life-threatening or more commonly just annoying, asthma has been my unwelcome companion for most of my life. Anything which helps people to function and live a normal life with asthma is a Good Thing. I offer my wholehearted support to Asthma UK.’

To make a donation, visit www.dont-wait.org or for further information about Asthma UK, visit our website www.asthma.org.uk.

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